B2B vs. B2C; Services vs. Products

When writing articles for the glassCanopy marketing blog, we generally use the terminology “buyer” and “seller” as opposed to talking about “consumers”, “products”, or “services”.  This is because most of what we write is equally applicable to B2B and B2C… services and products.

In those cases where we’re talking about specific use cases we make that explicit.

B2B vs. B2C

While many marketers have intellectually accepted the idea that marketing to business involves marketing to individual people and thus is not fundamentally different from consumer marketing, it’s clear from a quick review of the marketplace that this theoretical acceptance does not always translate to practice.

To make glassCanopy’s position clear: while we believe that there are definite differences  between B2B and B2C, at the end of the day companies are made up of individual people and most of the time corporate buying behavior mirrors the behavior of small groups of individuals… not mindless mobs, gigantic Borg entities, or even committees.  Therefore, we find that B2B marketing has more commonalities with B2C marketing than differences.  Brands matter. Emotional connections matter. Brand personality matters. Design matters.  And all of these matter more than specs and price.

On the other hand selling to government (B2G) is a totally different animal and frankly we don’t know much about it.  (So you should probably go somewhere else if that is your main focus.)

About Services vs. Products

It’s a rare product offering that doesn’t include some element of services and vice versa.  Either way you’re not selling a thing, you’re selling a solution and fulfilling a need.  So, we’ve never really understood why some people get hung up on how different selling services are versus selling things.  They’re the same the process.  In both cases you must provide value and establish trust.

Rich Quarles

Rich Quarles

Rich is a marketing strategist focused primarily on startups, technology, and financial services. He has advised startups that have collectively returned almost $2 billion to founders and investors. Rich founded glassCanopy in 2001.
Rich Quarles

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